"something of an extraordinary nature will turn up..."

Mr. Micawber in Dickens' David Copperfield

Kit Foster's

CarPort

AUTOMOTIVE SERENDIPITY ON THE WEB

CarPort
January 31st, 2007

De sooner, de better. Chances are, if you live in the United States, your mail is delivered in one of these Long Life Vehicles. Ours is; if you live in a city yours may be brought to your door by an ambulatory carrier. Since 1986, the United States Postal Service has purchased nearly 100,000 LLVs….
Read full article

January 24th, 2007

The French had a word for it: “automobile,” combining Greek and Latin roots, though it was initially used as an adjective, as in voiture automobile (self-propelled conveyance). First used around 1890, the term did not catch on in the United States until 1899, when it replaced “motocycle;” in Britain “motor car” was preferred and still….
Read full article

January 17th, 2007

I’ve owned 40-some cars in my lifetime, but only one Cadillac. In the summer of 1967, in a misguided fit of youthful enthusiasm, I bought a boat. Since my Austin-Healey Sprite was an inappropriate tow car, I looked around for something heftier. After considering a 1955 Cadillac, a 1960 Lincoln and the car I should….
Read full article

January 10th, 2007

Alfred P. Sloan’s doctrine of “a car for every purse and purpose” was firmly entrenched by the early 1930s. General Motors had a clear cascade of makes, from Cadillac at the top of the market to Chevrolet at the bottom. Walter Chrysler recognized the phenomenon, which led him to introduce price-leader Plymouth to balance his….
Read full article

January 3rd, 2007

As I was finishing my Christmas shopping a fortnight ago, I came back to the parking lot and was greeted by these two silver cars. The one on the right is my everyday Infiniti I30, on the left a Jaguar XJ6, successor to the Series 3 Jag XJ6 I admitted lusting after in a previous….
Read full article

Serendipity: n. An aptitude for making desirable discoveries by accident.
“They were always making discoveries, by accident and sagacity, of things they were not in quest of.”
Horace Walpole, The Three Princes of Serendip
© 2004-2017 Kit Foster
Powered by WordPress